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Volume 10, No. 7: May 20, 2005

A Small Ceramics Gallery in Oaxaca:

From time to time, we feature a particular artisan or gallery. It’s been a while since the last one, mostly because the press of current events and travel stories have pre-empted the space. Today, we are pleased to feature “Tierra Quemada” (literally, “burned earth”), a gallery run by a family of potters, opened about a year ago in the small mall in the front part of the Plaza las Virgenes, a multi-use building containing the venerable Posada Margarita hotel, across from Labastida Park. The first few photos, starting with the masthead, come from Tierra Quemada. (more…)

By Stan Gotlieb, ago
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Volume 10, No. 4: March 11, 2005

A New Museum Opens in San Bartolo:

A few years ago, an earthquake did serious damage to the municipal museum located across the street from the Zócalo in San Bartolo Coyotepec. San Bartolo is famous for its' black pottery, but the museum -then and now - has never been exclusively a display case for the "barro negro" (black clay) produced in the town. Rather, it has been - and is - a showcase for the best talents in the region, including pieces woven on the backstrap loom, ceramics from Atzompa, ceramics by the Aguilar family of Ocotlan and the Valencia clan from San Antonino, and wood carvings from both San Martín Tilcajete and Arrazola, among others. (more…)

By Stan Gotlieb, ago
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Volume 10, No. 3: February 25, 2005

News from the AMLO front:

Still-besieged mayor / governor of the Federal District, Andres Manuel López Obrador, may be on the ropes, but he’s not out by any means. This week, the congressional committee in charge of such things is supposed to decide whether or not to strip him of his constitutional immunity (all public officials have it), a first step toward trying him in court for defying a court order to halt construction on a road to an important public hospital in a timely matter. It would be a tempest in a teapot (even if convicted of these trumped up charges, he would face no fines or prison time: what he did is not recognized as a crime in Mexican law), were it not for another law which states that anyone convicted of, or under indictment for, any charge, may not run for public office. (more…)

By Stan Gotlieb, ago